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Zambia

1. Openness To, and Restrictions Upon, Foreign Investment

Policies Toward Foreign Direct Investment

In general, Zambian law does not restrict foreign investors in any sector of the economy, although there are a few regulations and practices limiting foreign control laid out below.  The country has affirmed its commitment to fostering private sector development and attracting FDI. FDI, which is monitored by the government, continues to play an increasing role in Zambia’s economy, contributing to increased capital inflows and overall investment.  FDI is facilitated through the Zambia Development Agency (ZDA), which is responsible for fostering economic growth and development in Zambia through promoting trade and investment and an efficient, effective, and coordinated private sector-led economic development strategy.

Zambia has undertaken institutional reforms aimed at improving its attractiveness to investors; these reforms include the Private Sector Development Reform Program (PSDRP), which addresses issues related to cost of doing business through legislation and institutional reforms, and the Millennium Challenge Account (MCA), which addresses some issues relating to transparency and good governance.  However, frequent government policy changes create uncertainty for foreign investors. Recent examples include: a planned, rapid transition from a value-added tax regime to a sales tax currently projected to take effect on July 1, 2019; taxes and royalty increases in the mining sector that took effect on January 1, 2019 and mark the 10th significant change to mining taxes and regulations in 16 years; and constant and unpredictable limits on various crop exports.

Limits on Foreign Control and Right to Private Ownership and Establishment

The ZDA does not discriminate against foreign investors, and all sectors are open to both local and foreign investors.  Foreign and domestic private entities have a right to establish and own business enterprises and engage in all forms of remunerative activities, and no business ventures are reserved solely for the government.  Although private entities may freely establish and dispose of interests in business enterprises, investment board approval is required to transfer an investment license for a given enterprise to a new owner.

Currently, all land in Zambia is considered state land and ownership is vested in the president; there is no private land in the country.  Land titles held by foreigners are for 99-year state leases; ownership is not conferred. According to the government, the current land administration system leaves little room for the empowerment of citizens, especially the poor and vulnerable rural communities.  The government began reviewing the current land policy in earnest in March 2017. The resulting draft land policy would assert more central government control over traditional lands and seeks to reduce the lease tenure on foreign-owned properties from 99 years to renewable terms of 25 years.  Both traditional chiefs and foreign investors have objected to terms in the draft bill, which has not been presented to Parliament and is currently with the Ministry of Lands for further stakeholder consultation.

Foreign investors in the telecom sector are required to disclose certain proprietary information to the ZDA as part of the regulatory approval process.  Further information regarding information and communication regulation can be found at the website of the Zambia Information and Communication Technology Authority at  http://www.zicta.zm  .

The ZDA board screens all investment proposals and usually makes its decision within 30 days. The reviews appear routine and non-discriminatory and applicants have the right to appeal the investment board decisions.  An investment application is screened to determine: the extent to which the proposed investment will help create employment; the development of human resources; the degree to which the project is export-oriented; the likely impact on the environment; the possible technology transfer; and any other considerations the Board considers appropriate.

The following are the requirements for registering a foreign company in Zambia:

  1. At least one and not more than nine local directors must be appointed as directors of a majority foreign-owned company.  At least one local director of the company must be resident in Zambia, and if the company has more than two local directors, more than half of them shall be residents of Zambia.
  2. There must be at least one documentary agent (a firm, corporate body registered in Zambia or an individual who is a resident in Zambia).
  3. A certified copy of the Certificate of Incorporation from the country of origin must be attached to Form 46.
  4. The charter, statutes, regulations, memorandum and articles, or other instrument relating to a foreign company must be submitted.
  5. The Registration Fee of K4,166 (~ USD 348.00) must be paid.
  6. The issuance and sealing of the Certificate of Registration marks the end of the process for registration.

This information can also be found at the web address of the Patents and Companies Registration Agency (PACRA), http://www.pacra.org.zm  .

Other Investment Policy Reviews

The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) conducted its first review in sub-Saharan Africa on the basis of the OECD Policy Framework for Investment in Zambia in 2012.  The OECD review made the following recommendations regarding Zambia’s investment environment: 1) develop a harmonized national investment policy; 2) take better advantage of the investment promotion and facilitation options available; 3) undertake a cost-benefit analysis with regard to fiscal incentives; 4) improve the consultative mechanisms for policy development; 5) strengthen the framework for Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs); 6) strengthen the oversight and enforcement mechanisms of the regulatory framework; and 7) develop mechanisms to channel industry demands for human resource development.

Following the review, the government began an ongoing process to consider new investment reforms, including development of a harmonized investment policy and a review of its tax incentive system and framework for PPPs.  In 2016, the government, under the leadership of the Ministry of Commerce, Trade, and Industry, adopted an industrial policy to support and accelerate industrialization in Zambia. The policy addressed issues of productive capacity for enterprises to promote the production and consumption of local content.  Zambia has also committed to develop a Green Growth Strategy that makes sustainable and equitable use of Zambia’s natural resources within ecological limits.

Report found here: http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/investment-policy/zambia-investmentpolicyreview-oecd.htm  

The GRZ conducted a trade policy review through the World Trade Organization (WTO) in June 2016.  The report found that Zambia recorded relatively strong economic growth at an average rate of 6.6 percent per year up to 2015.  The improvement was attributed to growing demand for copper (the main export product) and its spillover effects on some other sectors such as transport, communications, and wholesale and retail trade.  Buoyant construction activity and higher agricultural production also helped.

The trade policy review report of 2016 reached the following conclusions: the government will continue to implement programs and initiatives directed at attaining inclusive growth and job creation and pay particular attention to macroeconomic stability, diversification of the economy, support to small and medium enterprises (SMEs), engagement with cooperating partners, and promotion of investment.  Zambia is committed to continue to use bilateral, regional, and multilateral frameworks to support the growth and development of the economy.

Report found here: https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tpr_e/tp440_e.htm  

Business Facilitation

The Zambian government, often with support from cooperating partners, has undertaken economic reforms to improve its business facilitation process and attract foreign investors, including steps to support transparent policymaking and to encourage competition.  The impact of these progressive policies, however, has been undermined by persistent fiscal deficits and widespread corruption. Business surveys generally indicate that corruption in Zambia is a major obstacle for conducting business in the country. Given these reasons, companies prefer using a specialized public procurement due diligence tool in order to help mitigate the costs and risks of corruption involving public procurement processes in Zambia.

The Zambian Business Regulatory Review Agency (BRRA) has responsibility for Regulatory Services Centers (RSCs) that serve as a one-stop shop for investors.  RSCs provide for an efficient regulatory clearance system by streamlining business registration processes; providing single licensing system; reducing the procedures and time it takes to complete the registration process; and increasing accessibility of business registration institutions by placing them under one roof.

With an RSC, an investor need contact only one entity to obtain all the necessary paperwork in one streamlined and coordinated process.  This means investors, both local and foreign, are provided with centralized organizations that tend to their needs comprehensively, without having to move from one stakeholder agency to another.  The government established RSCs in Lusaka, Livingstone, Kitwe, and Chipata, and has plans to establish additional RSCs so that there is at least one in each of the country’s 10 provinces. Information about the RSCs can be found at the following links:

The Companies Act No. 10 of 2017 was operationalized through a statutory instrument (June 2018) and implementing regulations (February 2019) aimed at fostering accountability and transparency in the management of companies.  Companies are now required to maintain a register of beneficial owners, and persons holding shares on behalf of other persons or entities must now disclose those beneficial owners.

In order to facilitate improved access to credit, the Patents and Company Registration Office (PACRA) established the collateral registry system, a central database that records all registrations of charges or collaterals created by borrowers to secure credits provided by lenders.  This service allows lenders to search for collateral offered by loan applicants to see if that collateral already has an existing claim registered against it.  Creditors can also register security interests against the proposed collateral to protect their priority status in accordance with the Movable Property (Security Interest) Act No. 3 of 2016.  Generally, the first registered security interest in the collateral has first priority over any subsequent registrations.

Parliament passed the Border Management and Trade Facilitation Act in December 2018.  The Act, among other things, calls for coordinated border management and control to facilitate the efficient movement and clearance of goods; puts into effect provisions for one-stop border posts; and simplifies clearance of goods with neighboring countries.  While one-stop border posts have existed for several years and agencies are co-located at some border crossings, agencies still had conflicting regulations and processes. The new law seeks to harmonize outstanding issues.

Outward Investment

Through the ZDA, the government continues to undertake a number of activities to promote investment through provision of fiscal and non-fiscal incentives, establishment of Multi-Facility Economic Zones (MFEZs), the development of SMEs, as well as the promotion of skills development, productive investment, and increased trade.  However, there is no incentive for outward investment nor is there any known government restriction on domestic investors from investing abroad.

2. Bilateral Investment Agreements and Taxation Treaties

Zambia has signed Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) with thirteen countries (six in force and seven not yet in force).  Six countries have BITs in force with Zambia: France, Germany, Italy, Mauritius, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. Zambia has signed bilateral reciprocal promotional and protection of investment protocols with most of the member states of both the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) and the Southern African Development Community (SADC).

On October 2, 2000, Zambia became a beneficiary of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) market access treaty with the United States and was again found eligible for continuous benefits under AGOA in March 2019.  In November 2001, COMESA, of which Zambia is a member, signed a Trade and Investment Framework Agreement with the United States. Zambia initiated market access through the Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) interim Economic Partnership Agreement (IEPA) with the European Union on September 30, 2008.  In completing these negotiations, the provisions of the trade in goods chapter and related annexes of the ESA IEPA now apply to Zambia. Zambia has signed protective agreements with Chinese, Nigerian, Libyan, and Indian investors.

6. Financial Sector

Capital Markets and Portfolio Investment

Government policies generally facilitate the free flow of financial resources to support the entry of resources in the product and factor market.  Banking supervision and regulation by the Bank of Zambia (BoZ) has improved slightly over the past few years. Improvements include revoking licenses of some insolvent banks, denying bailouts, limiting deposit protection, strengthening loan recovery efforts, and upgrading the training of and incentives for bank supervisors.  High domestic lending rates and the limited accessibility of domestic financing constrain business. High returns on government securities encourage commercial banks to invest heavily in government debt to the exclusion of financing productive private sector investments.

The Lusaka Stock Exchange (LuSE), established in 1993, is structured to meet international recommendations for clearing and settlement system design and operations.  There are no restrictions on foreign participation in the LuSE, and foreigners may invest in stocks on the same terms as Zambians. The LuSE has offered trading in equity securities since its inception and, in March 1998, the LuSE became the official market for selling Zambian government bonds.  Investors intending to trade a listed security or government bond are now mandated to trade via the LuSE. The market is regulated by the Securities Act of 1993 and enforced by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) of Zambia. Secondary trading of financial instruments in the market is very low or non-existent in some areas.  As of the beginning of 2018, there are 22 companies listed on the LuSE with a portfolio worth about K63 billion (USD 6.6 billion).

Existing policies facilitate the free flow of financial resources into the product and factor markets.  The government and the BoZ respect IMF Article VIII by refraining from restrictions on payments and transfers for current international transactions.  Credit is allocated on market terms and foreign investors can get credit on the local market, although local credit is relatively expensive and most investors therefore prefer to obtain credit outside the country.

Money and Banking System

The financial sector is comprised of three sub-sectors according to financial sector supervisory authorities.  The banking and financial institutions sub-sector is supervised by the BoZ, the securities sub-sector by the SEC, and the pensions and insurance sub-sector by the Pensions and Insurance Authority.  Zambia’s banking sector is considered relatively well-developed in the African context, but the sector remains highly concentrated. There are currently 19 banks in Zambia with the largest four banks holding nearly two-thirds of total banking assets.  The dominance of the four largest banks in deposits and total assets has been diluted by increased market capture of smaller banks and new industry entrants, an indication of growing competitive intensity in this segment of the banking market. Government policies generally facilitate the free flow of financial resources to support the entry of resources in the product and factor market.  There continued to be a steady increase in electronic banking and related services over the last few years. As stated above, banking supervision and regulation by the BoZ has improved slightly over the past few years. The Banking and Financial Services Act, Chapter 387, and the Bank of Zambia Act, Chapter 360, govern the banking industry.

The BoZ’s current policy rate, as of February 2019, is 9.75 percent.  The commercial lending rate ranged between 23 and 26 percent as of 2018, among the highest in the region.  The persistence of high interest rates led the government to urge commercial banks to reduce their lending rates in order to stimulate private sector growth and the economy as a whole.  One factor inhibiting more affordable lending is a culture of tolerating loan default, which many borrowers view as a minor transgression. Non-performing loans (NPLs) in the sector are growing with some estimates as high as 15 percent.  The government itself is a contributor as it is in arrears of about USD 1.3 billion to many contractors who reportedly hold a high percentage of the NPLs.

Lender data reporting remains erratic and credit rating information is not widely available.  In addition, high returns on government securities encourage commercial banks to invest heavily in government debt, to the exclusion of financing productive private sector investments.  Banking officials acknowledge that they need to upgrade the risk assessment and credit management skills within their institutions in order to better serve borrowers. At the same time, they argue that widespread financial illiteracy limits borrowers’ ability to access credit.  Banks provide credit denominated in foreign currency only for investments aimed at producing goods for export. Banks provide services on a fee-based model and banking charges are generally high. Home mortgages are available from several leading Zambian banks, although interest rates are still very high.

To operate a bank in Zambia, the bank must be licensed by the Registrar of Banks, Financial Institutions, and Financial Businesses (“the Registrar”) whose office is based at the BoZ.  The decision to license banks lies with the Registrar. Foreign banks or branches are allowed to operate in country as long as they fulfill BoZ requirements and meet the minimum capital requirement of USD 100 million for foreign banks and USD 20 million for local banks.  According to the BoZ, many banks in the country have correspondent banking relationships; it is difficult to assess how many there are or whether any bank has lost any correspondent banking relationships in the past three years. It is also difficult to analyze if any of those correspondent relationships are currently in jeopardy as the daily management of those relationships are carried out by the individual banks and not by the BoZ.

The Non-Bank Financial Institutions (NBFIs) are licensed and regulated in accordance with the provisions of the Banking and Financial Services Act of 1994 (BFSA) and related Regulations and Prudential Guidelines.  As key players in the financial sector, NBFIs are subject to regulatory requirements governing their prudential position, consumer protection, and market conduct in order to safeguard the overall soundness and stability of the financial system.  The NBFIs comprise 8 leasing and finance companies, 3 building societies, 1 credit reference bureau, 1 savings and credit institution, 1 development finance institution, 80 bureau de change, 1 credit reference bureau, and 34 micro-finance institutions.

Private firms are open to foreign investment through mergers and acquisitions.  The CCPC reviews and handles big mergers and acquisitions. The High Court of Zambia may reverse decisions made by the Commission.  Under the CCPA, foreign companies without a presence in Zambia and taking over local firms do not, however, have to notify their transactions to the Commission, as it has not established disclosure requirements for foreign companies acquiring existing businesses in Zambia.  In the past decade, some mergers and acquisitions include Bharti Airtel’s purchase of Zain/Celtel Zambia, the acquisition of a huge U.S. multinational energy corporation’s assets in Zambia by Engen Petroleum, a large U.S. retailer takeover of Game Stores through the acquisition of Massmart Holdings Limited of South Africa, Barrick Gold Corp takeover of Equinox Lumwana Copper Mines, the purchase of BP shares in Southern Africa, including BP Zambia, by Puma Energy, the Jinchuan Group Limited takeover of Metorex Chibuluma Copper Mine, Atlas Mara’s acquisition of Finance Bank Zambia and subsequent combination with BANC ABC, and private equity house EMR Capital’s purchase of eighty percent of indirect interest in Lubambe Mine, held equally by African Rainbow Minerals (ARM) and Vale International.

Foreign Exchange and Remittances

Foreign Exchange Policies

There are currently no restrictions or limitations placed on foreign investors converting or transferring funds associated with an investment (including remittances of investment capital, earnings, loan repayments, and lease payments) into freely usable currency and at a legal market-clearing rate.  Investors are free to repatriate capital investments, as well as dividends, management fees, interest, profit, technical fees, and royalties. Foreign nationals can also transfer and/or remit wages earned in Zambia. Funds associated with investments can be freely converted into internationally convertible currencies.  The BoZ pursues a flexible exchange rate policy, which generally allows the currency to freely float, though it has intervened heavily to support the local currency, the kwacha, in 2014 to 2016. Transfers of currency are protected by IMF Article VII.

In March 2014, the government announced the revocation of SI Number 33 (mandating use of the kwacha for domestic transactions) and SI Number 55 (monitoring foreign exchange transactions).  The government experienced challenges implementing these statutory instruments and – along with problems of fiscal management and weakening global copper prices – the SIs were perceived as undermining confidence in Zambia’s economy and currency, leading to sharp depreciation of the kwacha.  The decision to revoke the SIs was widely praised in the business community. The kwacha, however, has remained weak in historical terms against the dollar and in early April 2019 was trading between 12-12.5 kwacha per dollar.

Over-the-counter cash conversion of the kwacha into foreign currency is restricted to a USD 5,000 maximum per transaction for account holders and USD 1,000 for non-account holders.  No exchange controls exist in Zambia for anyone doing business as either a resident or non-resident. There are no restrictions on non-cash transactions. The exchange rate of the Zambian national currency is mostly determined by market forces; because the volume and value of exports from Zambia are overwhelmingly related to the extractive industries sector, mining companies’ financial transactions play a major role in exchange rate determination.

Remittance Policies

There are no recent changes or plans to change investment remittance policies that tighten or relax access to foreign exchange for investment remittances.  There are no restrictions on converting or transferring funds associated with an investment (including remittances of investment capital, earnings, loan repayments, or lease payments) into freely usable currency at the legal market clearing rate.  Foreign investors can remit through a legal parallel market, including one utilizing convertible, negotiable instruments such as dollar-denominated government bonds issued in lieu of immediate payment in dollars. There are no limitations on the inflow or outflow of funds for remittances of profits or revenue and there is no evidence to show that Zambia manipulates the currency.  Zambia is a member of the Eastern and Southern Africa Anti-Money Laundering Group (ESAAMLG), which conducted an assessment of the implementation of anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing (AML/CTF) measures in Zambia in November 2007. ESAAMLG coordinates with other international organizations concerned with combating money laundering, studying emerging regional typologies, developing institutional and human resource capacities to deal with these issues, and coordinating technical assistance where necessary.  Zambia has demonstrated commitment to establish an AML/CTF framework. The enactment of the Prohibition and Prevention of Money Laundering Act and the Anti-Terrorism Act, establishment of the Anti-Money Laundering Investigations Unit and the Financial Intelligence Center as the sole designated national agencies mandated to handle AML/CTF and other serious offences, and September 2018 accession to the Egmont Group reflect this commitment.

Sovereign Wealth Funds

The GRZ had planned to launch a Sovereign Wealth Fund (SWF) following the 2015 reincorporation of the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) as the parastatal holding company, but has yet to establish the fund.

8. Responsible Business Conduct

Zambia’s economy has shown relatively strong performance since the 1990s.  The government in theory limits its direct involvement in business to strategic investments deemed critical for the delivery of public goods and services, and seeks to maintain high standards of consumer protection.

While Zambia is a high-performer among low-income countries in terms of Responsible Business Conduct (RBC), it lacks clearly formulated or well-implemented RBC policies.  Zambia ranked 118 among 138 countries for the second year in a row in the 2017-2018 Global Competitiveness Report. Note: The 2018-2019 report is not yet published.

The government has sought to improve implementation of legislative and regulatory reforms that impact RBC.  As an example, most investment ventures are required to create and submit environmental impact assessments as a prerequisite to the approval process.  The government requires many investment sectors, such as insurance, banking, and financial services, to submit annual audited financial statements as a licensing condition.  In the case of financial services, quarterly publication of financial statements is compulsory and rigidly enforced by the BoZ.

Zambia has ratified a number of international human rights conventions, such as the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment or Punishment; the Convention on the Rights of the Child; and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.  At the national level, the lead authority for upholding human rights norms is the Human Rights Commission (HRC), while the Industrial and Labor Relations Act addresses labor issues. The Act provides the legal framework for trade unions, employers’ organizations and their federations, the Tripartite Consultative Labor Council, and the Industrial Relations Court.  The Employment Act, Chapter 268, is the basic employment law, while the Minimum Wages and Conditions of Employment Act makes provisions for the regulation of minimum wage levels and minimum conditions of employment. Currently, the average minimum wage per month for employees, starting with general or domestic workers, stands at K993 kwacha (~USD 83), to include food and transportation.

The Zambian government seeks to maintain high standards of consumer protection by, for example, following the United Nations Guidelines for Consumer Protection.  The Competition and Fair Trading Act of 1994 and superseding Competition and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 seek to encourage competition in the economy, protect consumer welfare, strengthen the efficiency of production and distribution of goods and services, secure the best possible conditions for the freedom of trade, expand the base of entrepreneurship, and regulate monopolies and concentrations of economic power.  The 2010 Act includes specific consumer protection provisions. The Board of Commissioners is composed of representatives from different ministries and professional associations. Statutory agencies are encouraged by the government to regularly engage in stakeholder consultations whenever new laws and regulations are being considered; this does not always occur in practice, or may occur in ways that are not universally transparent.

Generally, all regulatory agencies that issue operating licenses have statutory reporting requirements that businesses operating under their laws and regulations must meet.  For example, the Banking and Financial Services Act has stringent reporting provisions that require all commercial banks to submit weekly returns indicating their liquidity position.  Late submission of the weekly returns or failure to meet the minimum core liquidity and statutory reserves incur punitive penalty interest, and may lead to the placement of non-compliant commercial banks under direct supervision of BoZ, closure of the undertaking, or the prosecution of directors.

All companies listed under the Lusaka Stock Exchange (LuSE) are obliged to publish interim and annual financial statements within three months after the close of the financial year.  Listed companies are also required to disclose in the national print media any information that can affect the value of the price of their securities. According to the Companies Act, Chapter 388, company directors need to generate annual account reports after the end of each financial year.  The annual account, the auditor’s report or reports on the accounts, and the directors’ report should be sent to each person entitled to receive notice of the annual general meeting and to each registered debenture holder of the company. A foreign company is required to submit annual accounts and an auditor’s report to the Registrar.

The government fully supports measures that encourage responsible business conduct and has recognized the importance of adopting international practices.  The main challenges include domesticating international practices and strengthening regulatory capacities. In many cases, the business sector is encouraged by the government to adopt practices that promote responsible business conduct on a “voluntary basis.”  For example, the Institute of Directors Zambia (IODZ) actively advocated the introduction of “Board Charters” that set out good corporate standards (such as ethical conduct) with which business enterprises will be associated and will implement. The Citizens Economic Empowerment Commission (CEEC) is also promoting the adoption of “Sector Codes” by the business sectors that commit themselves to supporting citizens’ economic empowerment.

In addition, a number of public institutions have established Integrity Committees that address the strengthening of internal policies and procedures for combating corruption.  The private sector is also encouraged to either establish similar Integrity Committees or to strengthen their corporate governance standards to effectively address corruption. Most local manufacturers of consumer products have submitted to voluntary product testing and certification by the Zambia Bureau of Standards (ZABS); ZABS certification is then embossed on the product labels as a “mark of quality” indicating the product’s suitability for consumption.  Legislative measures have also been agreed with food processors and drug manufacturers that indicate product manufacturing and expiry dates.

Most mining companies have acceded to the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) adapted in February 2009 for Zambian conditions, and allow independent audits of their operations and financial reporting.  EITI audit results are available to the general public. Zambia has been an EITI compliant country since September 2012. The government receives revenue in the form of taxes from all extractive industries, including mining.  The mining sector accounts for about 10 percent of GDP and around 70 percent of export revenue. All exploration and mining activities are governed by the Mines and Minerals Act of 2008 and other mining related regulations that include:  the Mineral Royalty Tax (Repeal) Act, the Petroleum Exploration and Production Act, the Explosives Act, and the Environmental Protection and Pollution Control Act. The GRZ, through the Ministry of Mines and Minerals, conducts open bidding and grants mining licenses to qualified bidders.  The Zambian Revenue Authority collects all payments from mining companies and remits them to the Ministry of Finance. The Zambian Revenue Authority regularly publishes production volumes for copper, cobalt, and gold, and the names of companies operating in the country.

13. Foreign Direct Investment and Foreign Portfolio Investment Statistics

Table 2: Key Macroeconomic Data, U.S. FDI in Host Country/Economy

Host Country Statistical Source USG or International Statistical Source USG or International Source of Data:
BEA; IMF; Eurostat; UNCTAD, Other
Economic Data Year Amount Year Amount
Host Country Gross Domestic Product (GDP) (M USD) 2017 $25.86    2017 $25.86  www.worldbank.org/en/country /zambia  
Foreign Direct Investment Host Country Statistical source USG or International Statistical Source USG or International Source of Data:
BEA; IMF; Eurostat; UNCTAD, Other
U.S. FDI in Partner Country (M USD, stock positions) 2017 N/A 2017 $58 BEA data available at http://bea.gov/international/direct_investment_multinational_companies_comprehensive_data.htm   
Host Country’s FDI in the United States (M USD, stock positions) 2017 N/A 2017 N/A BEA data available at http://bea.gov/international/direct_investment_multinational_companies_comprehensive_data.htm   
Total Inbound Stock of FDI as % host GDP 2017 3.37% 2017 3.3% http://www.boz.zm/statistics3.htm  

https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/BX.KLT.DINV.WD.GD.ZS  

Host country statistical data used are almost non-existent. If they exist there is not a central source for retrieving the data and at most times do not match international source.


Table 3: Sources and Destination of FDI

Direct Investment From/in Counterpart Economy Data
From Top Five Sources/To Top Five Destinations (US Dollars, Millions)
Inward Direct Investment Outward Direct Investment
Total Inward $19,819 100% Total Outward $1,636 100%
Canada $3,981 20% Congo, Dem Rep Of  $550 34%
Switzerland $2,806 14% Mauritius $227 14%
British Virgin Islands $2,478 13% United Arab Emirates $ 224 14%
China, P.R. Mainland $ 2,112 11% Luxembourg $195 12%
South Africa $1826 9% South Africa $127 8%
“0” reflects amounts rounded to +/- $ 500,000.


Table 4: Sources of Portfolio Investment

Data not available.

Investment Climate Statements
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